Online & Mobile Security

Follow these helpful tips to keep your personal and business information protected online.


Helpful Tips

Your Passwords

  • A strong password is at least eight characters in length and includes a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters.
  • Create passwords that are not easy to guess (do not contain birth date, child’s name, pet’s name, or part of User ID).
  • Change passwords frequently. If you suspect your password may be compromised, change it immediately and notify Washington Trust Bank.
  • Never share passwords or security devices. Do not post passwords in or around work areas.
  • Avoid using an automatic login feature that saves usernames and passwords.

Your COMPUTER

  • Stay Up-To-Date
    Keep your computer operating system and web browsers up to date. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.
  • Secure Internet connection
    Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.
  • Protection Software
    Make sure your computer is equipped with both comprehensive spyware and virus protection software and a firewall, which prevents unauthorized user from gaining access to your computer.
  • Shop safely.
    Before shopping online, make sure the website uses secure technology. When you are at the checkout screen, verify that the web address begins with "https". Also, check to see if a tiny locked padlock symbol appears on the page.

Your Mobile Device

  • Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices.
    Making it difficult to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.
  • Log out.
    Completely log out when you finish a mobile banking session.
  • Protect your phone.
    Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software, or malware, just like you do for your computer by installing mobile security software.
  • Use caution when downloading apps.
    Apps can contain malicious software, worms, and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”
  • Download the updates.
    Keep your phone and mobile apps safe by keeping them updated with the newest release.
  • Avoid storing sensitive information.
    Don't store passwords or a social security number on your mobile device.
  • Tell your financial institution.
    Notify your financial institution immediately if you change your phone number or lose your mobile device.
  • Be aware of shoulder surfers.
    The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings especially when you’re punching in sensitive information.
  • Wipe your mobile device.
    Before you donate or trade in your mobile device, use specialized software or the manufacturer’s recommended technique to wipe your device. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.
  • Beware of mobile phishing.
    Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. And be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.
  • Watch out for public Wi-Fi.
    Public connections aren't very secure; so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network.
  • Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately.

Your Email & Phishing

How do I know if an email is real or phishing?

The social engineering techniques that phishers use try to emulate the kinds of messages you’d normally expect: an automated email from a system saying your password is nearly expired, security alerts, or messages urging you to validate your online banking credentials. Watch for language that has an extreme sense of urgency if you do not take action, logos that appear distorted, web addresses that are unfamiliar to you, unusual spelling or grammatical errors.

Forward phishing emails to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at spam@uce.gov – and to the company, bank, or organization impersonated in the email. 90% of people are fooled by a well-constructed “phishing” email. Be aware that an email that looks entirely reputable may be designed that way by a fraudster. The email may appear to be official but is actually an attempt to download a computer virus and/or collect your confidential information. Criminals often send mass emails knowing that a subset of recipients will respond and open the door to subsequent fraud.
  • Don’t click on links in emails
    Rather than clicking a link in an email, sign on to your trusted web site directly by typing the web address from your records, or by using your browser bookmark/favorite.
  • Don’t trust an email that appears to be from a familiar source
    It is not enough that an email has a ‘from’ address that you recognize. Fraudsters can doctor email ‘from’ addresses to match your trusted sender, such as your financial institution or an airline.
  • NEVER provide confidential information in response to an email request
    Never provide user names, passwords, account numbers, tax ID numbers, social security numbers, or other private details in response to an email request.
  • Verify the authenticity of emails by using a phone number from your records rather than the phone number provided in the email.
    If an email suggests a required action, place a phone call to check the validity of the request, using a number from your records rather than the number provided in an email. Then, if needed, use a web address that you have confirmed with your trusted source.
  • Don’t open attachments without independently verifying the authenticity of the email.
    Verify the legitimacy of an email before opening an attachment. Be sure to use Contact Information from your own records rather than the number provided in an email.

Your Business

  • Do not use public or other unsecured computers
  • Establish and pay attention to system alerts; examples include:
    • Minimum Balance Alerts
    • Debit Posted Alerts
    • Password Changed Alerts
  • Dedicate a PC solely for financial transactions.
    No web browsing, emails, or social media (an FBI recommended best practice).
  • Check the last login date/time every time you sign on.
  • Review account balances and detail transactions regularly.
    Review transactions (preferably daily) to confirm payment and other transaction data, and immediately report any suspicious transactions to Washington Trust Bank.
  • Don't use personal information.
    When creating account nicknames or other titles, do not use account numbers, your social security number, or other account or personal information.
  • Whenever possible, register your computer.
    Register your computer to avoid having to re-enter challenge questions and other authentication information with each login.
  • Never leave a computer unattended while signed on.
  • Never conduct banking transactions while multiple browsers are open on your computer.
  • After completing your online activity, sign off to close the connection.
  • Use separate accounts.
    Use separate accounts for electronic and paper transactions to simplify monitoring and tracking any discrepancies.

To Report Fraud

Call Priority Service at 800.788.4578

TO BLOCK A DEBIT OR CREDIT CARD AFTER HOURS:

Call Priority Service at 800.788.4578 and follow the prompts to Card Services to block your card.

Mobile photo person on phone

WTB Mobile

Suspend your card or report it lost or stolen from within the WTB Mobile app.

More about WTB Mobile

To Report Fraud

Call Priority Service at 800.788.4578

TO BLOCK A DEBIT OR CREDIT CARD AFTER HOURS:

Call Priority Service at 800.788.4578 and follow the prompts to Card Services to block your card.

Mobile photo person on phone

WTB Mobile

Suspend your card or report it lost or stolen from within the WTB Mobile app.

More about WTB Mobile

To Report Fraud

Call Priority Service at 800.788.4578

TO BLOCK A DEBIT OR CREDIT CARD AFTER HOURS:

Call Priority Service at 800.788.4578 and follow the prompts to Card Services to block your card.

Mobile photo person on phone

WTB Mobile

Suspend your card or report it lost or stolen from within the WTB Mobile app.

More about WTB Mobile